Former east german ministry for state security

A court in Hanover in the state of Lower Saxony affirmed in June the German armed forces’ decision to discharge a soldier because of his rejection of Israel’s right to exist and support for the US- and EU-classified terrorist organization Hamas.

The soldier of Afghan background lashed out at Israel, Jews and the United States during questioning by Germany’s military counter-intelligence service (MAD) in 2016.

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According to the legal decision obtained by The Jerusalem Post on Friday, the unnamed soldier said “F***... the Jews and the USA” and justified support for Hamas and Fatah. The German military determined in March that the soldier’s comments violated Germany’s anti-hate law. MAD said the soldier also rejected Israel’s legitimacy as a state.

The court stated that the soldier’s pro-Hamas and anti-Israel assertions are incompatible with military conduct in Germany’s free, democratic social order.

In February, the soldier denied he is a supporter of Islamist groups and merely stated his position toward Israel. He added it does not matter to him what Israel does.

The soldier started his service in 2016 and planned to serve until 2024. The court’s decision said he claimed he had language difficulties because he was raised in Afghanistan and has only been in the Federal Republic for a few years. The soldier denied his allegedly anti-Jewish and anti-American statements when questioned by MAD. He said he is a Shi’ite and has showed sympathy for his religious brethren.

The Hanover court wrote there are no indications that MAD verified false statements from the soldier. The court said he is required to pay roughly €7,600 for costs associated with his appeal.



Daniel Franch is a 2016-2017 Fulbright ETA grantee to Germany who returned for a second year to the Gymnasium Philanthropinum in Dessau. In May 2016, he graduated from East Carolina University with a Bachelor of Arts in German and a dual Bachelor of Arts degree in History and History Education. Daniel has spent his Fulbright experience living in both Leipzig and Dessau where he teaches English and American Studies in grades 6-12, improves his Italian language skills, and promotes more interorganizational cooperation between the German Fulbright Alumni Association, Parlamentarisches Patenschafts-Programm, and other transatlantic exchange programs in Germany.


After 1989 Schön, a master craftsman from Stralsund, a city on the Baltic Sea, initially racked up one success after the next. Although he no longer owns the Porsche he bought after reunification, the lion skin rug he bought on a vacation trip to South Africa -- one of many overseas trips he has made in the past 20 years -- is still lying on his living room floor. "There's no doubt it: I've been fortunate," says the 51-year-old today. A major contract he scored during the period following reunification made it easier for Schön to start his own business. Today he has a clear view of the Strelasund sound from the window of his terraced house.

As West Germany was reorganised and gained independence from its occupiers, the German Democratic Republic was established in East Germany in 1949. The creation of the two states solidified the 1945 division of Germany. [25] On 10 March 1952, (in what would become known as the " Stalin Note ") Stalin put forth a proposal to reunify Germany with a policy of neutrality, with no conditions on economic policies and with guarantees for "the rights of man and basic freedoms, including freedom of speech, press, religious persuasion, political conviction, and assembly" and free activity of democratic parties and organizations. [26] This was turned down; reunification was not a priority for the leadership of West Germany, and the NATO powers declined the proposal, asserting that Germany should be able to join NATO and that such a negotiation with the Soviet Union would be seen as a capitulation. There have been several debates about whether a real chance for reunification had been missed in 1952.

But Götz had no regrets and went on to win the UEFA Cup in 1988 with his new West German team, Bayer Leverkusen. But life in the West did not mean he, or others, had escaped the clutches of the Stasi (indeed, he later found out that the Stasi had, within their files, photographs of his new home in West Germany). Cases of defectors drugged and smuggled back East, although rare, were not unheard of. A friend of Götz in West Germany, a fellow East German, was killed in a car accident. Götz, suspecting it was no accident, feared for his own life.

Former east german ministry for state security

former east german ministry for state security

As West Germany was reorganised and gained independence from its occupiers, the German Democratic Republic was established in East Germany in 1949. The creation of the two states solidified the 1945 division of Germany. [25] On 10 March 1952, (in what would become known as the " Stalin Note ") Stalin put forth a proposal to reunify Germany with a policy of neutrality, with no conditions on economic policies and with guarantees for "the rights of man and basic freedoms, including freedom of speech, press, religious persuasion, political conviction, and assembly" and free activity of democratic parties and organizations. [26] This was turned down; reunification was not a priority for the leadership of West Germany, and the NATO powers declined the proposal, asserting that Germany should be able to join NATO and that such a negotiation with the Soviet Union would be seen as a capitulation. There have been several debates about whether a real chance for reunification had been missed in 1952.

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former east german ministry for state securityformer east german ministry for state securityformer east german ministry for state securityformer east german ministry for state securityformer east german ministry for state security

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