Steroid nasal spray risks

Unneeded medications should be disposed of in special ways to ensure that pets, children, and other people cannot consume them. However, you should not flush this medication down the toilet. Instead, the best way to dispose of your medication is through a medicine take-back program. Talk to your pharmacist or contact your local garbage/recycling department to learn about take-back programs in your community. See the FDA's Safe Disposal of Medicines website ( http:///c4Rm4p ) for more information if you do not have access to a take-back program.

The most common side effects associated with fluticasone are headache , throat infection, nasal irritation, sneezing , cough , nausea , vomiting . Hypersensitivity reactions such as skin rash , itching , facial swelling, and anaphylaxis may occur. Some children may experience growth suppression when using fluticasone. A bloody nasal discharge ( nosebleed ) and septum perforation may occur. Fungal infection of the nose and throat, glaucoma , and cataracts are also associated with intranasal fluticasone.

There are no data with intranasal fluticasone furoate in patients with hepatic impairment. Data are available following inhaled administration of fluticasone furoate (as fluticasone furoate or fluticasone furoate/vilanterol) to subjects with hepatic impairment that are also applicable for intranasal dosing. A study of a single 400 microgram dose of orally inhaled fluticasone furoate in patients with moderate hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B) resulted in increased C max (42 %) and AUC(0-∞) (172 %) and a modest (on average 23 %) decrease in cortisol levels in patients compared to healthy subjects. Following repeat dosing of orally inhaled fluticasone furoate/vilanterol for 7 days, there was an increase in fluticasone furoate systemic exposure (on average two-fold as measured by AUC (0–24) ) in subjects with moderate or severe hepatic impairment (Child-Pugh B or C) compared with healthy subjects. The increase in fluticasone furoate systemic exposure in subjects with moderate hepatic impairment (fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 200/25 micrograms) was associated with an average 34% reduction in serum cortisol compared with healthy subjects. There was no effect on serum cortisol in subjects with severe hepatic impairment (fluticasone furoate/vilanterol 100/ micrograms). Based on these findings the average predicted exposure of 110 micrograms of intranasal fluticasone furoate in this patient population would not be expected to result in suppression of cortisol.

Steroid nasal spray risks

steroid nasal spray risks


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